PARCC and Standardized Tests in Massachusetts

Dear Gov. Baker,

I’m writing to you because I went to one of the forums regarding PARCC testing last night and was unable to testify. At all of the hearings that have been held, the same group of pro-PARCC employees of Teach Plus have arrived early (being paid a stipend to do so) and taken up the first 45 – 60 minutes of the three hours so that community members are not able to speak.

I work until 5:00 (with children, so I know not only that of which I speak, but also provide a community service giving quality child care so parents can work) and the earliest I could arrive was 5:40. We were told that the people “who arrived very late” would not be able to speak because of the long list ahead of us. This was adding insult to injury.

Because I didn’t get to speak my testimony in front of the panel, I am including it below. But right now I just need to speak from the heart. My sons’ educational experience is being ruined because of standardized testing. In Massachusetts, we make students go to school for thirteen years and then tell them they can’t have their diploma because they can’t pass one test. In his testimony a few weeks ago, Mayor Scott Lang of New Bedford had this to say:

The fact is the kids who aren’t passing the bubble test are being left behind and we’re gonna have to support them…we are setting up a caste system…we cannot tell people we will not give you your diploma even though you have earned it…but we will send you a check each month because you’re not gonna get into society…there aren’t enough people to subsidize the people we’re keeping out.

I have been through the process of listening forums before: on child care regulations, the library system takeover, and Holyoke receivership. Sadly we – the boots on the ground – all go and passionately speak our feelings about what’s happening, and the board that we are facing usually goes ahead and does exactly what it planned on anyway. I’m afraid that will happen again in this instance and it’s enough to make me lose faith in public education.

The upshot of this battle, in which I’ve done a lot of research and really thought about the issues at hand, is that I will be refusing all testing – including MCAS – for my sons from here on in. When they get to 10th grade, if it is still required for their diploma, I will have them take the MCAS so they can have the piece of paper that every student has worked their whole life for, and without which their prospects are ridiculously low.

I have been told that my sons should take the tests because its good for their school – that they will score high and the school needs the money. It is not my childrens’ job to make money for their school. This is tantamount to child labor. It is the school system whose job it is to give my children the education they deserve. Please put a moratorium on testing and let our students and teachers show you what they can really do in a healthy learning environment.

Amy Pybus
enc.

Testimony for PARCC Hearing

My name is Amy Pybus and I’ve worked with children for fifteen years. I’m here because basing students, schools and teachers performance on standardized test results is wrong. I’d like to tell you about some studies that have been done on standardized tests.

In the first study, a group of students were tested on vocabulary, reading, language, and mathematics. It showed that the girls consistently outscored boys in language, but the boys score was significantly higher than the girls in math. Is anyone surprised by that?

The year was 1977. We knew then that standardized tests were not a fair measurement of boys vs. girls – let alone special ed and second language learners.

In 1983, we heard this result: “Standardized tests are not sufficient to measure the full area of school effectiveness because they rate students on a narrow range of capabilities, only one set of educational goals, and a uniform set of teaching methods.”

Another study involved high school students in a small, working-class town who were drilled and tested over 4 years. The results indicated that a third of the class – which ended up dropping out of school – would have benefited from a vocational curriculum. Their career choices were influenced by socioeconomic status, rural location, and job preference – not by test scores.

That was in 1986.

Here’s another. “Employing standardized tests to ascertain educational quality is like measuring temperature with a tablespoon. Standardized tests have a different mission than indicating how good or bad a school is. They should not be used to judge educational quality.” The year was 1999.

And one final study. “Standardized tests are not objective or unbiased. The misuse of standardized testing and social expectations can affect minority groups. Using test data as an all-purpose solution does more harm than good. Education reform policy should rely predominately on input from teachers.”

That study was done last year.

For forty years we have heard over and over again from actual scientists that standardized tests don’t work. Yet here we are today, basing our entire educational paradigm on standardized testing, and spending $100 million per year in the process.

But then I realized – we don’t listen to scientists and researchers. We listen to businessmen. We listen to Bill Gates and his Teach Plus foundation, who are trying to make all students into computer engineers. It makes me wonder, what does Bill Gates know about education? Has he taught in a classroom or worked with children? Of course not. But we are allowing him and other powerful businessmen to dictate the education our children will receive. Any person who argues passionately in favor of standardized tests is not a teacher.

I know another billionaire computer guy – Steve Jobs. He said, “A lot of people in our industry haven’t had very diverse experiences. The broader one’s understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.”

That is what education is supposed to look like: a broad understanding of the human experience. We need to stop wasting so much time, money, and effort to try to make every child proficient in skills that they will not use again after school. When you universally have parents, teachers, students, and administrators telling you this system doesn’t work, you need to listen.

PS If you want to see another billionaire education guy check out this one: Edutopia. Use the force, George.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “PARCC and Standardized Tests in Massachusetts

  1. This quote from Teacher Tom’s blog somehow helps me keep the faith…..”People, too accustomed to the cynicism that the monied elites rely upon, often feel like there is nothing they can do, but look at what is happening. Look what can happen. None of us have to do it all, we just have to do our part, talking to our friends and families, reading, sharing our opinions, and, when necessary engaging in small acts of civil disobedience like opting our children out of high stakes testing. This is how our parade is made, this is how self-government works. And this is how we are going to transform public education in America”
    Don’t lose faith, Amy!

  2. Thanks for fighting for our kids, Amy. These tests are ridiculous and I really didn’t see the full brunt of it until this year. In Maple School, my kids’ teachers always seemed to somehow keep the pressures of the tests off the kids, but this year, Otis’s teachers at White Brook were so stressed out about the test, and they passed that right along to the kids. The results were disastrous for Otis and many other kids in the classroom who ended up feeling anxious, and unable to succeed. Sigh. And don’t even get me started about how the standardized tests do nothing to measure an area that my kids and many others thrive– interpersonal skills. Standardized tests not only devalue interpersonal skills, but they end up squashing this important skill because kids are made to feel like “bad” kids for not being able to sit quietly in their seats for hours on end being drilled with test talking strategies and their heads shoved with facts instead of taking part in meaningful, interactive learning experiences.

Leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s