What is Common Core?

There is so much debate about the common core that we tend to get lost in arguing over the details. I have been researching this topic for several months and have told many friends that I sound like a conspiracy theorist when I discuss it. They often respond, “That’s because it sounds like a conspiracy.” But everything I’m about to tell you is the plain truth – there is evidence for it all over the internet and news. The most important thing you need to know about common core is that is not an education agenda – it’s a business agenda, designed to turn public schools into profit centers.

A Brief History of Common Core

No Child Left Behind, rolled out by President Bush, was the first education package that required school and student “accountability” in the form of testing. When President Obama promised education reform many educators were thrilled to say goodbye to this disastrous legislation. But his Race to the Top program only made things worse. It doubled down on high-stakes testing tied to teacher performance, and promised funding to schools that signed on without having a curriculum in place to review.

At that time, the economy was collapsing and school budgets were already at bare bones, so of course governors around the country said yes to federal funding. But common core wasn’t finished yet.

Meanwhile…savvy businessmen sensed an opportunity. The owners of a curriculum and testing company approached Bill Gates and they began work on the common core (see the link above). They formed two panels, one for math, one for English, each with 15 “experts.” (Because we all know English and math are the only subjects kids need to learn.)

Who were these education experts? Mostly people from the testing industry (College Board and ACT), and politically connected think tanks. None of them were teachers, none had experience with special education, it’s possible none of these people ever stood in front of a classroom full of children. When they showed the outcome of these panels, the common core, to a real math and English teacher, they were horrified.

So thirty people who were not teachers wrote the basis of the nationwide curriculum for school children from grades K-12, without regard for children with special needs or English-language learners. Then required that all children get extremely high results on these tests or their teachers and schools would be in big trouble.

You may have noticed the outcome of common core requirements in our schools already – no recess or study hall, shortened lunch and between-class times, reduced gym time (because kids are awesome at sitting still for six hours a day). Because of common core, every possible minute of the day must be devoted to curriculum, with heavy emphasis on writing and math across the day. Music and art were already in trouble before common core – now kids have to choose them as electives, and art and music teachers are being told that they have to teach English in their curriculum.

But back to history. Bill Gates was meeting with senators, congressmen, and governors to present his education package. In a 2009 speech to senators he was quoted as saying (my emphasis):

“When the tests are aligned to the common standards, the curriculum will line up as well—and that will unleash powerful market forces in the service of better teaching. For the first time, there will be a large base of customers eager to buy products that can help every kid learn and every teacher get better. Imagine having the people who create great online video games applying their intelligence to online tools that pull kids in and make algebra and other subjects fun. All states and districts should collect common data on teachers and students. We need to define the data in a standardized way, we need to collect all of it for all of our students, and we need to enter it in something cheap and simple that people can share.

There’s so much wrong with that paragraph I don’t even know where to begin. What does he even mean? Gates doesn’t talk about education in terms of students, he talks about it in terms of market value.

And can I point out the irony of giving this speech in Philadelphia? The cradle of democracy? The very process that he completely sidestepped in implementing the common core nationwide, without any voter feedback.

So here’s where we stand:

  • Gates & his partners have created a curriculum, copyrighted it, and now own the rights to all textbooks, software, and materials that go along with it. Remember this curriculum will be required for all schools in every state.
  • Testing companies like Pearson jump in to create (using federal grant money) and sell PARCC tests (using state school budget money).
  • And the PARCC tests will eventually be required to be taken on – COMPUTERS! Which all schools across the country will have to buy. Does anybody know where you can get a computer?

There are many players who have discovered that they can use schools as profit centers. Up front, they receive government money from education budgets to prepare and develop tests. The schools are required to teach to the tests, buying materials developed by these players. The tests require computers bought by towns. I think we just figured out where school budgets have gone over the last decade. It turns out it’s not the bloodsucking teachers after all!

One more thing. After convincing senators and governors that they needed to sign on to common core, Gates and his friends went to the UN to promote it as a global curriculum. Megalomaniacal? Or just really good business sense?

I haven’t even gotten into what happens when kids start failing the tests. (Which if you haven’t looked at you really should.)

So what does happen with the test scores? The healthy schools in wealthy towns, you’re doing fine, here’s some (as little as we can spare) money for you. Middle ground schools, maybe with higher populations of special needs or ESL learners, you’re not doing great, we’re going to come investigate you. Schools in impoverished, diverse, or crime-ridden areas: you failed everything. We’re putting you in receivership. Students fail the tests because they aren’t designed to be fair, teachers lose their jobs because of high-stakes requirements, and the private company Teach Plus (funded by Gates) moves in to take control of the schools. So at the end of this cycle, schools aren’t a government project anymore, they are a business project.

I know, you’re still thinking conspiracy. Here is a recent article from the Washington post:

“At the 2012 education summit sponsored by Jeb Bush…those pushing Common Core reforms bluntly explained their strategy: First, politicians will actually embrace the Common Core assessments and then will use them to set cut scores that suggest huge numbers of suburban schools are failing. Then, parents and community members who previously liked their schools are going to believe the assessment results. Finally, newly convinced that their schools stink, parents and voters will embrace reform.”

The thing that gets me the most about this is that Gates says all children need to have better education because he can’t find skilled workers. If he had invested as much money as he has on Common Core – over $2 billion so far – into his own company he’d be able to hire all kinds of workers. But it is far cheaper to produce computers in China, so that was the choice he made.

A high school blogger sums it up well when he says:

“The testing industry has become larger than the NFL, with over sixteen billion dollars in revenue in a single year. Mega-businesses such as British scoring company Pearson Education have racked up billions in sales while paying their essay scorers close to minimum wage to read over two hundred essays a day. Essays that students have slaved over, reduced to a thirty-second skim through and a snap decision.”

We need to stop haggling over the details of the quality of the common core standards or the merits of high-stakes testing and return the control of public education to the people actually doing the job: teachers. A teacher friend recently told me, “This is the only profession where the person doing the job is not the expert.” The Gateses are not experts. Common core is not about improving education for your children. It is a predatory system designed by for-profit companies who plunder school budgets, require unpassable tests, and blame the kids and teachers for failing.

I’m an American High School Student and My Education System is Broken

Amy Pybus:

A high school students puts the issue of standardized testing in clearer words than anyone I’ve heard so far!

Originally posted on Youngchange-Bestchange:

The way I have been told to learn does not work. I don’t have a PhD in education, but what I do have is over ten years of firsthand experience in America’s education system.  Ten years of No Child Left Behind but still feeling acutely left behind.  Ten years of CST’S, CAHSEE’S, AP’S and every letter in between.  And ten years of watching some of my closest friends lose interest in what they had previously loved to do every day.

On paper, the system works for me.  I’ve almost always received high grades and I’ve successfully discerned how to distinguish between A, B, C or D.  But intelligence encompasses much more than being able to succeed on multiple choice tests, and my peers suffer from this generalized viewpoint every day.  As much as officials have adopted a one-size fits all attitude, they’ve also increasingly turned to corporate entities to decide the…

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Change in the Weather

Amy Pybus:

No Little Tykes cars were harmed in the writing of this post.

Originally posted on The Thickening:


Carl paced from room to room, checking the views from each window. Thunderstorms were coming. First, murmurings from the west, then rumblings and a cool breeze promising a break in the oppressive humidity. It was the first cool breeze in a week. There was no air conditioning in JJ’s farmhouse. “That guy”, Carl thought as he paced and sweated. “Too good for an air conditioner.”

Carl was house sitting for JJ. Or, hiding from Anne, his wife. Or, taking a break from her. Or, giving Anne a break from him, and not for the first time.

The breeze picked up and Carl watched the sky. There were clouds up there he had never seen before, moving in odd ways. Heavy sporadic raindrops blown from the storm proper hit the windows and roof. This was going to be a whopper. A direct hit, he thought. He made the rounds and closed…

View original 435 more words

PARCC and Standardized Tests in Massachusetts

Dear Gov. Baker,

I’m writing to you because I went to one of the forums regarding PARCC testing last night and was unable to testify. At all of the hearings that have been held, the same group of pro-PARCC employees of Teach Plus have arrived early (being paid a stipend to do so) and taken up the first 45 – 60 minutes of the three hours so that community members are not able to speak.

I work until 5:00 (with children, so I know not only that of which I speak, but also provide a community service giving quality child care so parents can work) and the earliest I could arrive was 5:40. We were told that the people “who arrived very late” would not be able to speak because of the long list ahead of us. This was adding insult to injury.

Because I didn’t get to speak my testimony in front of the panel, I am including it below. But right now I just need to speak from the heart. My sons’ educational experience is being ruined because of standardized testing. In Massachusetts, we make students go to school for thirteen years and then tell them they can’t have their diploma because they can’t pass one test. In his testimony a few weeks ago, Mayor Scott Lang of New Bedford had this to say:

The fact is the kids who aren’t passing the bubble test are being left behind and we’re gonna have to support them…we are setting up a caste system…we cannot tell people we will not give you your diploma even though you have earned it…but we will send you a check each month because you’re not gonna get into society…there aren’t enough people to subsidize the people we’re keeping out.

I have been through the process of listening forums before: on child care regulations, the library system takeover, and Holyoke receivership. Sadly we – the boots on the ground – all go and passionately speak our feelings about what’s happening, and the board that we are facing usually goes ahead and does exactly what it planned on anyway. I’m afraid that will happen again in this instance and it’s enough to make me lose faith in public education.

The upshot of this battle, in which I’ve done a lot of research and really thought about the issues at hand, is that I will be refusing all testing – including MCAS – for my sons from here on in. When they get to 10th grade, if it is still required for their diploma, I will have them take the MCAS so they can have the piece of paper that every student has worked their whole life for, and without which their prospects are ridiculously low.

I have been told that my sons should take the tests because its good for their school – that they will score high and the school needs the money. It is not my childrens’ job to make money for their school. This is tantamount to child labor. It is the school system whose job it is to give my children the education they deserve. Please put a moratorium on testing and let our students and teachers show you what they can really do in a healthy learning environment.

Amy Pybus

Testimony for PARCC Hearing

My name is Amy Pybus and I’ve worked with children for fifteen years. I’m here because basing students, schools and teachers performance on standardized test results is wrong. I’d like to tell you about some studies that have been done on standardized tests.

In the first study, a group of students were tested on vocabulary, reading, language, and mathematics. It showed that the girls consistently outscored boys in language, but the boys score was significantly higher than the girls in math. Is anyone surprised by that?

The year was 1977. We knew then that standardized tests were not a fair measurement of boys vs. girls – let alone special ed and second language learners.

In 1983, we heard this result: “Standardized tests are not sufficient to measure the full area of school effectiveness because they rate students on a narrow range of capabilities, only one set of educational goals, and a uniform set of teaching methods.”

Another study involved high school students in a small, working-class town who were drilled and tested over 4 years. The results indicated that a third of the class – which ended up dropping out of school – would have benefited from a vocational curriculum. Their career choices were influenced by socioeconomic status, rural location, and job preference – not by test scores.

That was in 1986.

Here’s another. “Employing standardized tests to ascertain educational quality is like measuring temperature with a tablespoon. Standardized tests have a different mission than indicating how good or bad a school is. They should not be used to judge educational quality.” The year was 1999.

And one final study. “Standardized tests are not objective or unbiased. The misuse of standardized testing and social expectations can affect minority groups. Using test data as an all-purpose solution does more harm than good. Education reform policy should rely predominately on input from teachers.”

That study was done last year.

For forty years we have heard over and over again from actual scientists that standardized tests don’t work. Yet here we are today, basing our entire educational paradigm on standardized testing, and spending $100 million per year in the process.

But then I realized – we don’t listen to scientists and researchers. We listen to businessmen. We listen to Bill Gates and his Teach Plus foundation, who are trying to make all students into computer engineers. It makes me wonder, what does Bill Gates know about education? Has he taught in a classroom or worked with children? Of course not. But we are allowing him and other powerful businessmen to dictate the education our children will receive. Any person who argues passionately in favor of standardized tests is not a teacher.

I know another billionaire computer guy – Steve Jobs. He said, “A lot of people in our industry haven’t had very diverse experiences. The broader one’s understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.”

That is what education is supposed to look like: a broad understanding of the human experience. We need to stop wasting so much time, money, and effort to try to make every child proficient in skills that they will not use again after school. When you universally have parents, teachers, students, and administrators telling you this system doesn’t work, you need to listen.

PS If you want to see another billionaire education guy check out this one: Edutopia. Use the force, George.

PARCC vs. Real Learning

This morning I sent both of my boys off to the same school, but they had two very different days ahead of them. Younger was packing up his bag with quiet activities – a book to read, a notebook to scribble in – because he would be refusing his PARCC test. This is the third day in two weeks that he would have to sit for the first 90 minutes of his school day twiddling his thumbs.

Older Son, on the other hand, had his 8th grade science project presentation today. A huge day – one that has been a benchmark since his first year of middle school. He was packing his bag with reports, models, and items he had used in his experiment. He was practicing his speech and worrying that he would forget all the tests he’d done. His excitement and nervousness were palpable. I was teary and bursting with pride as I watched this handsome young man head to the bus stop.

When Older first got to middle school we went to the 8th grade science fair. Judging from that night, I thought I’d be working on this project with him for weeks. They looked so elaborate, so detailed and involved, I imagined how complicated going through this process would be. I expected nagging, tearing around town for last-minute supplies, lots of tears and drama as I painfully forced calmly helped him get it done.

The truth was completely the opposite. Older Son worked on this project with his partner for weeks. They got together after school, made their own schedule, urged me to get on board when I wasn’t paying enough attention to their needs, and generally handled everything themselves. They spent one easy afternoon doing their tests and then invited friends over to run a second round. The result was good data, an amazing looking display, and a great experience with project planning and organization.

This is real education. The kids were allowed to choose their own experiment or project based on their interests. They were given a timeline and guided on how to plan and achieve all the steps they needed to finish. They had to write a theory and use scientific method to prove or disprove it. They experimented and then evaluated their data so it could be presented in a clear and attractive way. They had unexpected results that led them to ask more questions.

The learning from the science project will remain with my son because, among other things, it taught him a valuable skill in life: think for yourself. My other son was enduring the polar opposite through his experience with the PARCC test.

As I’ve become more involved in fighting PARCC, I’ve heard horror stories from parents. Kids who were forced by teachers and administrators to take tests even after their parents refused. Kids coming home in tears after being told they didn’t have to take the tests and then being coerced them to take them after all. Kids who normally receive classroom support on a special education plan taking tests – that are completely beyond their capability – without the help of their paraprofessional. Parents being lied to about the legality of what’s happening in their childrens’ schools. Teachers whose right to free speech has been essentially revoked by corporate interests. The testing companies are counting on parents to continue not thinking for themselves.

IMG_0464My sons get a good education when their teachers are in charge of what they’re learning. I was crowing last week when Younger Son came home with a permission slip for a field trip to the symphony to see Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring.” Sure, the kids won’t get it. They’ll spend more time jostling around in their seats than listening to the music. But maybe they’ll remember something. The form came with a flyer explaining how revolutionary the ballet was and how people almost rioted during its first performance. The conductor explained that “this is one of the most important pieces of music ever written” and how Stravinsky was a rebel. I feel like my children today are having to continue that tradition just by refusing to take a test in their school.

The tale of my two kids on this beautiful spring day was the difference between real education and corporate education. Our obsession with applying a business model to our schools strips teachers of their credibility and turns our kids into child labor for testing companies. Even in the face of everything we know about brain science, and more and more real evidence that our children need variety and spontaneity to learn, we are still quietly accepting that businesses know more about education than our teachers do. This is wrong, and it has to stop.

I urge anyone in MA to write to their house representative in support of the bills listed on this page: Mass Teachers and Parents United

3 Boys + 1/2 Day of School = More Learning than PARCC

Testing season has begun at my kids’ school, and we are suffering the burden of PARCC this year. For weeks I’ve been meeting with other parents, joining Facebook groups, trying to strategize ways to put a stop to this nonsense, and generally letting the rest of my life and responsibilities slide. But I’m not here to talk about PARCC today.

I’m here to talk about what happens when kids are allowed to explore and learn on their own. The boys had a half day of school and their favorite thing to do is walk home, stopping for pizza and candy on the way. But yesterday they had a mission. One of Older Son’s friends had a book with blueprints for “weapons of mini destruction:” blow darts, catapults, missile launchers, and the like made with household items like Q-tips, tape, and candy boxes.

The night before the half day, Older took inventory. He made a list of what we had here and what they’d need at the store. He searched on shelves and in drawers for random items and made sure he had enough cash to cover the items we didn’t. They did stop for a bite, and then they hit every store on the block for the rest of the supplies.

Mad scientist work area

Mad scientist work area

They came home and gathered all the rest of the tools they needed: twine, hole punchers, scissors, the sharpener from the knife block (I have no idea why. Probably just because it’s cool). I haven’t seen them this focused and excited in weeks. I didn’t hear a peep while they worked except for an occasional thud and then a lot of cackling laughter. The mad scientists were hard at work.

When they brought me the finished product I was truly impressed. I hadn’t thought they’d be able to come up with much, considering all the failed cereal-box projects we’ve tried in the past. These things actually worked. They were made with great care and attention to detail. I discovered the new deck of cards from Christmas had been sacrificed and at first had the mom reaction – Why would you ruin a complete deck?! – but quickly got past it when I realized how hard they’d worked. Plus they hadn’t played with the cards anyway. They couldn’t wait to show their creations to Dad when he got home from work.

When I asked the boys how the tests were going at school, I got one-word answers and exasperation about how hard the questions were. When I asked about the mission to create the blow darts, I got a lecture. “We had everything but the pens, and we didn’t think they’d have them at the auto parts store, but we were already on our way out of town so we decided to try there. And they had the roll of tape that was twice as big as at the hardware store, but it was 85 cents cheaper! The hardware store ripped me off! And I have no idea what the people at the drug store thought, these kids buying this random stuff, but nobody said anything. Did you know that when I shot this at the door, it stuck, but on the couch it didn’t? I need to figure out why. Maybe if I use a new dart.”

Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.

I had to put pictures of the finished products up on Facebook (some parents brag about their honors kids. I brag about homemade weapons). One of my teacher friends commented, “Created new from old…synthesized, designed and applied, and can explain his process… Too bad he won’t be tested on those abilities!” She didn’t even get to see the planning, economics, trials, and analysis that went into it as well.



That’s real learning. That’s what our kids should be doing in school, and it’s what I’m sure the teachers would much rather be doing as well. Our antiquated education system and dangerous obsession with testing have got to go. When the kids can learn more from being set loose on the town for an afternoon than they did in the previous two weeks of test prep, there is something rotten in Denmark (except Denmark doesn’t have standardized tests, and they rank significantly higher than America). In our time, in this economy, now more than ever, our children need to be creative thinkers and problem-solvers in order to carve out a decent living. Our schools must be allowed to provide them with the education they truly need.

This Ain’t the Super Bowl

On the morning of the Super Bowl I sit and reflect on my sons’ experiences in youth sports. I’ve been told that I’m not a good judge of these things, as someone who was a lousy athlete and never had the competitive gene. I’m also a mom and a teacher, so I come at games with the feeling that all kids deserve equal and fair treatment. Do you see the joke in that?

But for my family sports are a huge part of our lives. Every weekend and several nights a week are consumed by practices and games, and that’s great. Especially for many boys, sports are the one place they get to be themselves without being scolded for being too loud, too boisterous, and generally climbing the walls. On the field it’s encouraged.

Sports keep them busy, engaged, and most importantly, healthy. At my son’s last physical the doctor was shocked by the six-pack he has at his young age. Soccer. I wish that at some point in my life I’d been as fit as my boys are. I’d like to know what it feels like to have your body be that strong and responsive. Without all the work of actually exercising of course.

Overall I’m thrilled that my boys like to play and they’re pretty good at it. But as a parent I still have a hard time watching other parents behave like animals on the sidelines. Younger Son had an intensely scary indoor soccer game the other night. The parents were screeching and screaming from the opening moments, willing their kids on, and if that included being dirty in order to win, so be it. The kids responded by acting as if this was the Super Bowl, literally tackling, pushing, pulling, and slamming our guys into the walls. The coach was also screaming at his kids and hassling the ref from the start – you could see this team’s attitude came from the top down.

I watched in fear as a kid almost my size repeatedly crashed into Younger in goal. To add to my anxiety, Older Son had a collision in goal a few weeks ago and needed an x-ray to confirm he didn’t have a broken bone. I knew it would happen someday – that I’d be half-carrying one of my boys off the field, as I’ve seen so many other parents do – and praying our injuries would be the kind that heal quickly and easily.

A game like that makes me someone I don’t like. I’ve learned the hard way to be impartial at games, respect the other team, and remember the big picture: this ain’t the major leagues. But when I hear a bunch of adults calling for a bunch of kids to attack each other in an arena, gladiator-style, I start screaming just as loud as they are (but with positive comments – GOOD JOB GUYS!!! AT THE TOP OF MY LUNGS!!!). Even my husband, who is usually the amazingly calm/cool/collected and impartial-to-bad-calls coach, was screaming at the ref to blow his whistle.

I don’t understand why parents behave this way. What lesson do they want their kids to get out of this? In a meaningless game, in a winter indoor soccer league that most people see as a way to keep moving during the frigid months – why do you behave like winning this game at all costs is a matter of life and death? You know what’s a matter of life and death? Cancer.

After the game we were all shaken. Oddly, the players that were streaming out told Younger he’d done a great job in goal. Was their sportsmanship real or forced? It seemed genuine but our kids didn’t believe them, especially after the beating they’d just taken. They said it was just sarcastic, and I had a hard time myself figuring out what it meant. Is it possible to turn your decency on and off that quickly?

As we watched this spectacle my friend turned to me and said, “We should be so concerned about how they’re doing in math.” I think we aren’t because it’s not a place where we’re allowed to sit on bleachers and watch their performance. If we were, would we be there at every class, cheering the correct answers and screaming when they get one wrong? How screwed up would our kids be in that scenario. I’m actually laughing at the thought.

After the game we re-bandaged a swollen raspberry the size of a softball on Younger’s hip that he’d sustained that morning in practice. He said, “This was the worst day of soccer I’ve ever had.” I felt it too. So why do we do this?

I think more than any other place, in a different way than that math classroom, sports are teaching my kids a lot of life lessons. How to deal with people of all kinds, like those you will meet throughout your life. How to set a goal and keep at it, whether or not you succeed. How to work with others and play a role even if you don’t like it that much. How to deal with authority figures, whether you respect them or not. How to accept winning and losing with grace. How to stand up for what you need and accept the outcome.

My guys don’t care that much about the Super Bowl. Maybe that’s because I don’t. Maybe it’s because every four-hour football game broadcast has only 8 minutes of action compared to the 90-plus minutes in soccer. (Maybe I have a hard time cheering for wife-beaters, drug-abusers, and guys who literally kill people and get away with it because of money and power. Or as my husband put it, “Wouldn’t it be nice if people got as upset about inequality and corporate greed as they did about deflategate?” But that’s a different story.)

My husband remembers being rapt and excitedly watching every minute of the Super Bowl when he was young, but I haven’t felt that way since the 1987 Giants. Sure we’ll have some friends over and watch the game, but I’m most excited about having an excuse to eat crappy food. Mid-way through the second quarter, the boys will disappear with their friends upstairs and play FIFA. They won’t care that much about who wins. We’ll be back at soccer practice on Tuesday. There will be more games. There will be triumph, drama, pain, and despair, much like life. And they’ll have sensational abs.